flip your fingers and count down. It has been 60 years since the war on the Korean Peninsula broke out, Most of the above-mentioned figures are also dead,

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. The cover of the 20th issue of global magazine in 2010: a Korean Peninsula and n US presidents.

a Korean Peninsula and N U.S. presidents

flip their fingers to count down. It has been 60 years since the war on the Korean Peninsula broke out, including Obama, Bush Jr., Clinton, Bush Sr., Reagan, Carter, Ford, Nixon, Johnson, Kennedy, Eisenhower and Truman, Most of the above-mentioned figures are dead, but psychologically, the peninsula is still in a state of war, the barbed wire is still there, the T lookout is still there, and the ghost of the war is still there.

in the past 60 years, the United States has changed n presidents. What has not changed is the deep distrust of the North Korean leaders and regime, and the complex and changeable situation on the peninsula,

Korean Peninsula: the eternal “pawn” in the hands of the United States

Zhu Feng

2010 marks the 60th anniversary of the Korean War. Although 60 years have passed, the countries involved in and involved in this war have not forgotten, and it is impossible to forget this war.

their mutual policies are still deeply affected by the war 60 years ago. Especially between the United States and North Korea, whether or Pyongyang, has not really come out of the shadow of war. It is also impossible not to start from the Korean War to examine the US Korean policy.

since the signing of the armistice agreement of the Korean War on July 27, 1953, the gunfire on the peninsula has been silent, and the Korean policy of the United States has also changed from “hot war” to comprehensive cold war. From 1953 to the end of the cold war in 1991, the United States’ Korean policy, like the North-South confrontation on the 38th parallel on the peninsula, has not changed substantially.

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have always been the core of US policy towards North Korea by making every effort to maintain its military alliance with South Korea, prevent North Korea from launching military invasion against South Korea, strengthen the US military presence on the Korean Peninsula, maintain the armistice mechanism represented by the United Nations command during the Korean War, and curb North Korea’s attempt to “destroy and subvert South Korea in any form”.

however, in the eyes of the United States, North Korea is only a “secondary role” in the geopolitical confrontation in East Asia in the Cold War era. The Cold War confrontation with the Soviet Union and China in East Asia is a priority of the United States’ East Asia strategy. Maintaining the status quo on the peninsula and curbing North Korea’s provocation and military adventure are the basic principles of US policy towards North Korea. Especially after the 1960s, the strategic focus of the United States to prevent Communist expansion in East Asia turned to Vietnam, and the peninsula policy focused on “preventing” and “blocking” North Korea. During this period, although sporadic military conflicts and the killing of US military officers by North Korea occurred on the 38th parallel, the stability of the cold war pattern made the United States not interested in solving the so-called “North Korea issue” through direct military action against North Korea.

the end of the cold war and the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 made the biggest change in the geostrategic pattern of East Asia since the end of the Korean War. At the same time, the difference in the development process between North Korea and South Korea in recent 50 years has completely changed the basic situation of military confrontation between the north and south of the peninsula. Since 1986, South Korea’s military strength has generally begun to surpass North Korea. In that year, the situation of “strong north and weak south” in the Korean War has undergone historic changes.

to this end, the Bush administration supported the South Korean government’s “reconciliation” policy of seeking dialogue and North South contacts with North Korea. The North Korea policy of the Bush administration hopes to open the door of North Korea through the contact and cooperation between South Korea and North Korea, so that North Korea can evolve into “East Germany” in Asia under the guidance of economically developed and democratized South Korea. Finally, let the “38th parallel” become the same as the “Berlin Wall” collapsed on October 7, 1989, so as to realize the disintegration and reunification of South Korea to North Korea.

however, the situation on the peninsula began to mutate in 1992. North Korea’s secret nuclear program quickly replaced the United States’ illusion of “peaceful evolution” of North Korea and became the primary concern of the United States’ policy towards North Korea. Since the end of the cold war, the United States has lost its biggest strategic rival, the Soviet Union, the focus of the United States’ global security has shifted to the anti-proliferation and non-proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. North Korea, which has always had a secret nuclear weapons development program, has become a “thorn in the eye” of the United States.

in March 1993, the DPRK rejected the special verification of the International Atomic Energy Agency and announced its withdrawal from the nuclear non proliferation treaty, and the situation on the peninsula deteriorated again. This is the first DPRK nuclear crisis, and the DPRK nuclear issue has also directly contributed to the direct dialogue between the United States and the DPRK. In June 1993, Vice Foreign Minister Jiang Xizhu of the DPRK and assistant secretary of state for East Asian Affairs garuchi of the United States began a dialogue in New York. In June 1994, former US President Carter visited Pyongyang. After many twists and turns, on December 21, 1994, the United States and the DPRK signed the framework agreement in Geneva.

the Clinton Administration’s North Korea policy can be said to be both “dialogue” and “pressure”. The United States hopes to change North Korea by paying direct attention to the issue of North Korea’s weapons of mass destruction. Shortly after the Bush administration took office in January 2001, the second North Korean nuclear crisis broke out in October 2002. Then there was the “six party talks”. The North Korea policy of the Bush administration in its first term is to agree to the six-party talks and not to agree to the direct dialogue between the United States and North Korea; During the second term of office, the White House made a “great turn” in its policy. The United States directly launched bilateral talks with North Korea, hoping to reach a package agreement on North Korea’s final nuclear abandonment, increased U.S. assistance to North Korea and the normalization of U.S. – North Korean relations.

however, US DPRK relations and the six-party talks ended in the 20th century due to North Korea’s refusal to conduct comprehensive verification