history

if you listen to this debate on the radio, you will think that the two people are equal. But what TV viewers saw was another scene – the gaunt Nixon PK with a sunny and energetic face. “I noticed that the vice president’s lips were covered with sweat, and Kennedy was very confident and radiant,” recalls Sandel van nuke, who participated in the live broadcast that year

Nixon and Kennedy are at the scene of the TV debate (data picture)

the TV debate is a unique scenery in the U.S. General Election: the candidates are in front of the camera, showing political wisdom and personal style, and winning votes for themselves. Many people believe that TV debate is the most enjoyable part of the U.S. presidential election process, but for candidates, it is tantamount to “facing the job interview of tens of millions of examiners”, and the previous achievements will be wasted if they are careless. Over the past half century, many candidates have finally “fallen at the door of the White House” because of mistakes in this link.

Nixon “planted” in front of the camera

on September 26, 1960, in a live television studio of CBS in Chicago, presidential candidates Richard Nixon and John Kennedy stood in front of cameras and spotlights for the first television debate in the history of the U.S. presidential campaign.

Nixon was the vice president of the United States at that time. Kennedy was just a junior senator from Massachusetts. Many people thought it would be a one-sided competition — experienced Nixon would win. But the TV screen changed everything. Nixon had just had knee surgery. He was pale, thin and had a fever; Kennedy, who had just finished his California campaign, was dark and energetic. Two of them did not ask professional makeup artists to make up, but Kennedy’s assistant helped him simply “moisten and polish”, while Nixon smeared some male foundation cream.

if you listen to this debate on the radio, you will think that the two people are equal. But what TV viewers saw was another scene – a haggard Nixon PK and a sunny and energetic Kennedy. “I noticed that the vice president’s lips were covered with sweat, and Kennedy was very confident and radiant,” recalls Sandel van nuke, who participated in the live broadcast that year The contrast is so sharp that 65 million Americans watching the live broadcast can almost immediately decide who to vote for. Although the two have held three more TV debates since then, it doesn’t matter anymore. Alan Schroeder, a journalism professor at Northeastern University who specializes in the presidential debate, said: “Kennedy established an overwhelming advantage in the first debate, and Nixon was extremely difficult to overturn.” Afterwards, Kennedy also said that it would be difficult for him to enter the white house without TV debate. Perhaps this defeat cast too long a shadow in Nixon’s heart. He refused to participate in the television debate in the presidential elections in 1968 and 1972. Fortunately, it did not affect his final successful election.

extended reading:

Nixon and Kennedy are on the scene of the television debate (data picture)

the television debate is a unique scenery in the American general election: the candidates speak and talk in front of the camera, show their political wisdom and personal style, and win votes for themselves. Many people believe that TV debate is the most enjoyable part of the U.S. presidential election process, but for candidates, it is tantamount to “facing the job interview of tens of millions of examiners”, and the previous achievements will be wasted if they are careless. Over the past half century, many candidates have finally “fallen at the door of the White House” because of mistakes in this link.

Nixon “planted” in front of the camera

on September 26, 1960, in a live television studio of CBS in Chicago, presidential candidates Richard Nixon and John Kennedy stood in front of cameras and spotlights for the first television debate in the history of the U.S. presidential campaign.

Nixon was the vice president of the United States at that time. Kennedy was just a junior senator from Massachusetts. Many people thought it would be a one-sided competition — experienced Nixon would win. But the TV screen changed everything. Nixon had just had knee surgery. He was pale, thin and had a fever; Kennedy, who had just finished his California campaign, was dark and energetic. Two of them did not ask professional makeup artists to make up, but Kennedy’s assistant helped him simply “moisten and polish”, while Nixon smeared some male foundation cream.

if you listen to this debate on the radio, you will think that the two people are equal. But what TV viewers saw was another scene – a haggard Nixon PK and a sunny and energetic Kennedy. “I noticed that the vice president’s lips were covered with sweat, and Kennedy was very confident and radiant,” recalls Sandel van nuke, who participated in the live broadcast that year The contrast is so sharp that 65 million Americans watching the live broadcast can almost immediately decide who to vote for. Although the two have held three more TV debates since then, it doesn’t matter anymore. Alan Schroeder, a journalism professor at Northeastern University who specializes in the presidential debate, said: “Kennedy established an overwhelming advantage in the first debate, and Nixon was extremely difficult to overturn.” Afterwards, Kennedy also said that it would be difficult for him to enter the white house without TV debate. Perhaps this defeat cast too long a shadow in Nixon’s heart. He refused to participate in the television debate in the presidential elections in 1968 and 1972. Fortunately, it did not affect his final successful election.

extended reading:

a problem will win or lose