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on the eve of the 20th anniversary of German reunification, Hans Modero, 82, the last head of the democratic social party in East Germany, recently accepted an interview with Southern Weekend reporters to review his life and that of some other old East German Communists in the 20 years since he lost power.

modro (Southern Weekend reporter Zhang zhetu)

on October 3, Germany ushered in the 20th anniversary of national reunification.

if unification means “overall success” for current German politicians, it has a different taste for the members of the former East German ruling party who have undergone subversive changes in identity and status.

in the cold winter of 1989, the German unified socialist party found itself in a survival crisis for the first time. In December of the same year, the party changed its name to “Democratic Socialist Party” (hereinafter referred to as “democratic social party”). However, even if the party’s supreme leader, Aung Naik, was expelled from the party, their number of members was irresistibly reduced from 2.3 million to 700000, and finally rapidly reduced to 200000 after the reunification of the two Germany.

at that time, the democratic social party had no choice. They claimed to “break with communism”, but in the East German people’s assembly election in March 1990, they still got only 16.3% of the votes and became the opposition party. This bitter taste has been with them for 20 years.

in 2005, the democratic social party had 71000 members in Germany, including about 4400 members from the former West Germany. No matter how the name of the party is changed, they still accept the title of “member of the Communist Party of East Germany”. Among all Party members, nearly 60% are aged over 65. After 1990, more than 100000 party members were downsized, most of them died naturally due to old age.

on the eve of the 20th anniversary of German reunification, Hans Modero, 82, the last leader of the democratic social party in East Germany, recently accepted an interview with Southern Weekend reporters to review his life and that of some other old East German Communists in the 20 years since he lost power.

even if you step down, you should give East Germans a home.

Southern Weekend: after the fall of the Berlin Wall in November 1989, you were elected East German prime minister. What did you expect from that job?

Modero: in that position, my most important idea is that East Germany can continue to exist, and continue to exist as a socialist country. Therefore, a big problem I faced at that time was: how to make the German Democratic Social Party remain the party representing the working class and the working class people.

Southern Weekend: were you worried about losing power?

modro: from the bottom of my heart, I am not opposed to reunification. My parents, brothers and sisters all live in West Germany. I’m the only East German in my family. I also know that many families in East Germany were suffering from separation like me.

at the same time, the Soviet Union will no longer be the pillar of East Germany. As a politician, we must face the reality. So I think we must actively participate in the process of reunification. Otherwise, the interests of the East German people will be damaged.

I don’t know what future historians will say about me. But the government after me was a government of unconditional surrender, which did not enact any law in favor of the East German people.

Southern Weekend: what has your government done for the East Germans?

Modero: in the early 1950s, the East German government carried out large-scale land reform and distributed land to ordinary citizens in East Germany. Just a few weeks before the DPP lost power, I pushed for a new bill to protect the ownership of the shared land, because once East Germany was merged into West Germany and the land was returned to the original occupier, the East Germans would have nothing.

for similar reasons, the houses owned by the state were sold to the residents living in them at that time. This law is now known as the “Modero law”. Until now, when I took the subway, someone came up to me and said, “Mr. modro, thank you very much for making us home today.”

Southern Weekend: but for 20 years, many East Germans feel deprived.

Modero: many large state-owned enterprises have been completely closed down, closed down, or even completely flattened in the process of privatization. In this process, 85% of the state-owned property in East Germany has become the private property of West Germans, 10% has been purchased by foreign funds, and only 5% has really returned to the people of East Germany. This situation has caused many specific social problems today.

“it seems that we are criminals”

Southern Weekend: how is your life after leaving the prime minister?

Modero: I feel the life in West Germany silently and accept it with my heart. I went to many old West German cities, such as Hamburg, where my parents used to live and were buried after their death. After the unification of

,

,

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, I may be the only person who has held an important position in the East German government and served in the new federal government. I have devoted myself to politics all my life, so I can’t stop immediately – not that I’m used to power in hand, but that as a politician, I can feel the changes of the world at any time.

Southern Weekend: do you still get together often with other old friends of the East German Communist Party?

Modero: of course! We shared the responsibility of East Germany. Before the reunification of

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and

, I talked to the foreign minister of West Germany about not liquidating East German politicians. West Germany agreed. But then there was some high-level political opposition to East Germany